How to Send an e-card with VIPKid

When I was a little girl, I LOVED to check the mail. Of course, that’s because I would only get letters and cards and not any of the bills that fill my mailbox as an adult. Nonetheless, when I learned that we could send our students e-cards through VIPKids, I jumped on the chance.

Below, I have shared the step-by-step instructions for how to send an e-card.  Please note, you must use the phone app to send these. I have not found a way to send them through the portal

Step 1: Find Your Student

Open the phone list, and go to your list of classes. If the student you are looking for isn’t on the first page, scroll down until you see “All Bookings,” and click it to expand the list and be able to search by day.  Once you find a class with your student, click on it to open that specific class.  Then click on your student’s name to open the student screen.

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2. Enter the “Gift” Screen

At the top of the screen there is a gift box. Click on the gift box in the upper right hand corner to “Send a Gift.”

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3. Choose “Send a Card”

From this screen, you can either request the student’s mailing address (so you can send them a “real” gift, or you can send them an e-card.  To send an e-card, click the orange “Send a Card” button at the bottom of the screen.

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4. Select Your Card and Customize It.

Once you click on “Send a Card” look at the bottom of your screen, and you can scroll through a list of available e-cards. As of November 2019, all are currently free (meaning they don’t require any tokens.) In the past, some cost 5 tokens to send. Use your finger to scroll through the cards at the bottom to find one that you like. Once you have selected one, a list of pre-formatted messages will be visible that relate to the theme of the card. Click on each one to view the longer message.  Once you have selected the card type and the message you want to use, click “Send.”  You must check the box at the bottom that says “I agree to send this greeting card.” You can click on the sentence to read the full terms you are agreeing to.  Once you click the orange “Send” button, the student will be automatically notified of their card!

In the example below, I chose the birthday card template, and one of the four birthday messages available. 

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If you are looking for the ability to send fully customized messages without a template, I suggest looking into We Chat. There are pros and cons to using it, but I find it very effective when communicating with my regular students and their parents.

If you have any questions about how to send cards, or when it might or might not be appropriate, feel free to ask in the comments! Otherwise, enjoy!

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Class Prep: VIPKid Courses & Mock Class

I am a planner. I like nothing more than a color coded calendar with every hour neatly catalogued. So for me, it was important that I understand early how to prepare for a class.

Whether you are preparing for your interview, a mock class, or a regular class, the steps are basically the same.

  1. Review the objectives.
  2. Review the slides.
  3. Review key skills.
  4. Learn about your student.
  5. Prepare a list of props or realia.
  6. Practice.

To help get you started, let’s look at each of these individually.

  • Review the objectives. If you do nothing else in preparing for a lesson, be sure you review the objectives. These will tell you what your child needs to learn. If you are teaching the letter “a” there might be a picture of an apple on the page, but that could be just to demonstrate the letter sound. It’s not important that the student remember the word apple, nor is it important they know that an apple is red. If you are doing a lesson on food, learning about the apple might be an important part of the lesson. So read your objectives. Your interviewer and mock class mentor will be watching for this, and it will directly affect the results of your real students later.
  • Review the slides. You will want to scroll through the slides enough that you are comfortable with them. For new teachers, this could take several times. If you’ve taught for a while or done this lesson before, a quick once-over might be sufficient. You will not be effective in class if you are trying to squint and read instructions on each page during your interview or class.
  • Review key skills. This is extremely important, especially if you are not a current ESL or lower elementary teacher. If you are teaching a letter, be sure you know the correct sound the letter makes. Be sure you know the standard letter motion movements. You need to be sure you know how your mouth (and your student’s) should look when they make the letter sound. You might think that “Everyone knows how to say ‘R'” but if you aren’t prepared to correct a “ruh” to an “rrrrr” you will be in trouble. If you are interviewing, your mentor is sure to mispronounce something to test you. With real students, missing timely error correction can build bad habits and result in poor feedback from parents.
  • Learn about your student. In a mock class, VIPKid will provide some basic information about your student. They will provide their age and some prior vocabulary. Score bonus points if you can work some of these into your lesson, since it shows you are prepared! In a real class, there is a “Student Details” section. There you can learn the name and age of your student, the number of classes they have taken with VIPKid, their ratings on the last lesson, and feedback from prior teachers. This can help you adjust to their personal style in the classroom, so pay attention!
  • Prepare a list of props or realia. I love props! When you are interviewing, you will need to make sure to use at least two different types of props or realia. For example, if you are teaching the letter “P” you could choose two or more of any of the following types of props: a magnetic letter, a whiteboard, printed/laminated letters or pictures, blocks with letters, stuffed animals or toys that start with “p” (panda, puppy, pig.) I’m sure you could come up with many other ideas, but be sure you have and use at least two different types.
  • Practice. As you are getting started and preparing for your interview, practice is the most important thing you can do. Practice your TPR in the shower. Practice with your family. Practice on video on your computer. Practice with your dog. You cannot practice too much. Once you are hired and have taught several classes, practice becomes less important than the rest of the preparation since much of the TPR and slide work will be familiar to you.

The more classes you teach, the faster you can move through these steps. Today, I spend between 5-15 minutes preparing for each class, whereas I spent several hours preparing for my initial interview and mock class.

If you have questions about how I prepare or have tips of your own you would like to share, let me know in the comments below! If you are ready to join VIPKid and apply, feel free to use me as a referral and I will help in any way I can!