Classroom Dice Games

Next weekend, I’m hosting a VIPKid meetup. I’m so excited to meet other teachers in my area, and I want them to walk away with a little bit of inspiration.  So I have tried to put together some fun and creative things in their goodie bags that will help.

One of the things that I’m giving away at the meetup is a laminated packet of dice games that you can play in class, along with a super-cute die that I got at the Dollar Tree. (You guys – these came two in a pack for a dollar!) Here’s a similar, slightly smaller version available through my affiliate link at Amazon.com.

Why play a dice game in class?

First of all, it’s fun! These kids have long, hard days so I want to make their classes with me as fun as possible. Also, games can be an excellent form of extension in class. Here’s a short video I made to show how I would use this tool in action!

VIPKid Dice Games

What types of games do you play?

There is a wide variety of games you can play with a single die in class. I’ve tried to include some of my favorites.

  • Draw with me: Each time the student earns a reward, you (and maybe the student) get to draw a part of a picture. Based on what number you roll on the dice, that will determine how you should *try* to draw it. Note “try” is the key word. I’m not much of an artist, but that makes it even more fun!
  • Conversation starters: These can be great for older students in particular. You roll the dice, and you ask them a question, or they ask you a question!
  • Action games: These are excellent for younger, wigglier students. Each time they roll the dice, it will tell them a specific action to do. These can be customized to a specific lesson (Are they learning about farm animals? Act like a cow, horse, sheep, pig, etc.) Or they can be pure fun (dance party, high five, etc.)

Extension Ideas

I mentioned that these can be excellent forms of extension. At the simplest level, it gives your students experience counting. They can say the numbers or count the dots. If you are drawing, it can be a good opportunity to practice shapes. You can customize the games to be lesson-specific (and if you run out of ideas, there are plenty of others out on the Internet!) My favorite rewards are those that get the kids thinking about the lesson in new and different ways!

Where can I get these?

If you don’t happen to be coming to my meetup, don’t worry! You can download these yourself at https://www.vipkidresources.com/. This is an amazing site by Jennifer Anderson with a variety of props and rewards.

How can I customize this for other uses?

I would have loved to have used this type of game when I was a corporate trainer. I personally would have the game posted or written on the whiteboard at the beginning of class and set goals for the day. Each time we met one of our goals, I would draw part of the picture on an easel, and every student could draw on a large post it. For the dice, I probably would use something like these!

I hope you found this helpful. Have you tried this in your classroom? I’d love to hear how it went in the comments!

If you are new to VIPKid and would like some help getting started, I’d love to help with any questions you may have. Let me know how I can help you through the application process!

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The Prop Report #3 – 6-in-1 Puzzles

“…they could have been looking at the VIPKid curriculum when they designed the puzzles!”

Introduction:

Welcome to the third installment of my series: The Prop Report. In this series, I plan to share my favorite props and rewards that I use in my ESL classroom. The link to the product is an affiliate link, so if you choose to purchase the item through the link, I get a little bonus. For more info about this series of posts, you can read my overview and full disclaimers here.

The product:

6-in-1 Puzzle Sets

Manufacturer:

LQT Limited

Recommended for ESL classroom?

Yes (for lower levels!) These are perfect for VIPKid level 2

Recommended for hands on learning?

Yes! But only for younger kids. Since there are only 5 or 6 pieces per puzzle, they are too simple for older kids.

Pros:

I personally have the transportation puzzle. (That’s what you’ll see in my video below.) I love it because sometimes I teach a student several lessons in the same unit, but I can do different puzzles for variety! I love that they have fun animals and bright colors (both great extension tools.) When I purchased this, it was sold as a single puzzle. Now it’s part of a set of four, and I swear, they could have been looking at the VIPKid curriculum when they designed the puzzles!

  • transportation
  • farm animals
  • wild animals
  • aquatic animals

I can easily think of lessons for each of these!

These are very easy to use in the classroom because each piece is numbered on the back. I don’t really enjoy puzzles and I certainly don’t want to figure them out on the spot with my student, so I love that they come with a small cheat piece that shows what the puzzle should look like completed.

The puzzle pieces are thick and sturdy, and they show up well on camera.

Cons:

The way I choose to attach these to my whiteboard is by magnet. While it works, it can sometimes be a little bit clunky to connect the pieces. There might be a better way to use these (maybe thinner magnetic strips?) but as long as you are comfortable with the puzzles and familiar with your student, they work great!

See it in action:

You can see my unofficial product demo here: YouTube: Prop Report #3

In summary:

This prop set is a yes if you teach level 2 with VIPKid. They will provide great variety in your class and plenty of extension opportunities!

If you would like to purchase it, here’s my link on Amazon.com:

LQT Ltd Baby Wooden Toys Puzzles Jigsaw Puzzle Colorful Animal/Traffic/Ocean/Farm Puzzles 6 in one Box Educational Table Game Toddlers

 

For other issues of The Prop Report:

Google Slides Magic

By now, you may know I love Google Slides. I usually default to the classic rewards and use them to extend on our lesson. Every once in a while, I will make a very unique, custom reward that I use for one specific student.

A couple of weeks ago, my sweet student Tracy brought some paper frogs she had drawn and cut out. They all wore clothes and crowns, and she said one was the mom, the dad and the baby. That same class, she brought her My Little Ponies to class with her.

As background, Mom used to get very upset when Tracy brought toys to class. In feedback, I explained we could use them, as long as Tracy just brought one or two toys, so Mom reluctantly agreed. As we used them more and more in class, Tracy got more excited about learning, and Mom got on board.

Fast forward… after this frog class, I thought it would be fun to make Tracy a special reward, so I wrote a story using Google Slides. I downloaded most of my images from my subscription to PNG tree, and I made up a story about the frog prince who lost his parents. Tracy is in the unit studying “feelings” so the topic was great to ask “How does he feel?”

Tracy was delighted to see that I had a custom story for her, and she recognized her toys from the last lesson!

In a rare occurrence, Mom wasn’t in class with her that week, but when I got the feedback, Mom thanked me for making the reward and asked if I could send her the pictures from the slides. (In China, they can’t get to Google Slides, even if I wanted to send her the full lesson.)Screenshot (1)

I took screenshots for her, and sent them via WeChat.

In our next class, as soon as I turned on the camera, Tracy held up a printed version of my story! She proceeded to read the entire thing to me, inserting the emotions she had learned to describe the characters. She and mom had been practicing all week until Tracy could read it on her own!

My heart just melted!

Here is a video I made so you could see how I first used it as a reward for Tracy, and then how she read it back to me. The audio is not very good from the playback, but it’s still adorable! Watch the cutest thing ever here: Google Slides Magic Video

Thank you to Google Slides and WeChat for making it possible to build such fulfilling relationships with families across the world.

If you would like more information about using Google Slides with VIPKid or are just interested in getting started in general, please let me know in the comments!

Happy teaching (and sliding!)